Norma Jeane (aka Marilyn Monroe) at Catalina Island c.1943 

Norma Jeane (aka Marilyn Monroe) at Catalina Island c.1943 

ourmarilynmonroe:

Marilyn Monroe in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953)

ourmarilynmonroe:

Marilyn Monroe in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953)

wehadfacesthen:

Marilyn Monroe, 1955

wehadfacesthen:

Marilyn Monroe, 1955

If anybody ever asked you what I was like.
What Marilyn Monroe was really like.
How would you answer them?  

Marilyn in hair and make up tests for Let’s Make Love in 1960.


Rare photograph of Marilyn Monroe on the set of Some Like It Hot, 1958.

Rare photograph of Marilyn Monroe on the set of Some Like It Hot, 1958.

Footage of a young Marilyn in her modelling days in 1946.

Marilyn Monroe + Tongue

"I saw her bodily - Marilyn - for the first time and I was struck as by an apparition in a fairy tale. Well, she’s beautiful - anybody can notice this, and she represents a certain myth of what we call in France ‘la femme eternelle’. On the other hand, there’s something extremely alert and vivid in her, an intelligence. It’s her personality, it’s a glance, it’s something very tenuous, very vivid, that disappears quickly, that appears again.       You see, it’s all these elements of her beauty and also her intelligence that makes the actress not only a model but a real woman expressing herself. Like many people, I heard many things that she had said, but last night I had the pleasure of having dinner next to her and I saw that these things came fluidly all the time… all these amusing remarks, precise, pungent, direct. It was flowing all the time. It was almost a quality of naivete… and it was completely natural.       In her you feel the woman, and also the great discipline as an actress. She’s American and it’s very clear that she is—she’s very good that way; one has to be local to be universal.”
- Henri Cartier-Bresson

"I saw her bodily - Marilyn - for the first time and I was struck as by an apparition in a fairy tale. Well, she’s beautiful - anybody can notice this, and she represents a certain myth of what we call in France ‘la femme eternelle’. On the other hand, there’s something extremely alert and vivid in her, an intelligence. It’s her personality, it’s a glance, it’s something very tenuous, very vivid, that disappears quickly, that appears again.
      You see, it’s all these elements of her beauty and also her intelligence that makes the actress not only a model but a real woman expressing herself. Like many people, I heard many things that she had said, but last night I had the pleasure of having dinner next to her and I saw that these things came fluidly all the time… all these amusing remarks, precise, pungent, direct. It was flowing all the time. It was almost a quality of naivete… and it was completely natural.
      In her you feel the woman, and also the great discipline as an actress. She’s American and it’s very clear that she is—she’s very good that way; one has to be local to be universal.”

- Henri Cartier-Bresson


Marilyn Monroe poses for Harold Lloyd during a photo shoot at Marilyn’s Los Angeles apartment by Philippe Halsman, 1952

Marilyn Monroe poses for Harold Lloyd during a photo shoot at Marilyn’s Los Angeles apartment by Philippe Halsman, 1952

Marilyn Monroe photographed by George Barris, 1962

vavavoomrevisited:

… and her captured in moment from her 1961 film The Misfits

vavavoomrevisited:

… and her captured in moment from her 1961 film The Misfits

Marilyn Monroe photographed by Milton Greene, 1954

missingmarilyn:

Marilyn Monroe photographed by Sam Shaw, 1957.

missingmarilyn:

Marilyn Monroe photographed by Sam Shaw, 1957.